McCain and the U.S. Council for World Freedom

By Glenn Kessler
Washington Post
October 8, 2008

When John McCain severed his ties with a group linked to ultra-rightwing death squads in Central America may make a difference considering some of the literature associated with the U.S. Council for World Freedom.

McCain has said he resigned from the Council's board in 1984 because he was uncomfortable with the group's activities, but his name was still on the group's letterhead in 1986. He also attended the group's "Freedom Fighter of the Year" award ceremony on Oct. 3, 1985.

On July 15, 1985, the group's newsletter featured an article by Robert H. Goldsborough that appears to belittle concerns about then-President Reagan's decision to visit a cemetery with 49 graves of Waffen-SS officers.

"Those misguided souls who accused President Reagan of insensitivity for visiting the German cemetery at Bitburg are wallowing in ears of pity over the past crimes of the Nazi regime which collapsed over 40 years ago," the article begins. "They want to keep the memory of the holocaust alive so that it can never happen again. Crocodile tears! It is happening again ... and again, and again, right now, in the modern world; only the crimes of today are not being perpetrated by the Nazis but by their philosophical and demonical soul mates, the communists."

The article goes on to argue that Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and the Sandinistas in Nicaragua are engaged in "Holocaust now."

Goldsborough, identified on the web as a former staff investigator for the House Committee on Un-American Activities, is author of a book called The Network of Power which purports to reveal the "the handful of powerful unelected men who secretly rule America." In an interview conducted in 1998 that appears on the web, Goldsborough identified who he felt were the "top four world elite who he thought controlled the world" -- Edward Bronfman of Seagrams and the World Jewish Congress; then-Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin; then-Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan; and financier George Soros.

Goldsborough, now associated with a group called Americans for Immigration Control in Monterey, Va., did not return a call left on the group's answering machine.

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