‘Netherlands Forced CIA Boss out in Spying Row’

NIS News Bulletin, Netherlands - Jun 12, 2008

THE HAGUE, 13/06/08 - The head of the American CIA secret service in the Netherlands had to leave his job in 2005 in a dispute between The Hague and Washington on secret CIA operations, De Telegraaf reported yesterday. The espionage row has until now been carefully kept from the public in order not to put relations with the US under pressure, said the newspaper.

De Telegraaf said the CIA 'station chief' involved left the Netherlands in 2005 after the heads of the Dutch security services lost confidence in him. The Dutch Intelligence and Security Services Supervisory Commission (CTIVD) was reportedly informed of the problems with the CIA behind closed doors.

CTIVD chairman I.P. Michiels van Kessenich-Hoogendam confirmed that the problem was solved by the replacement of the CIA chief, De Telegraaf reports. Since the departure of the CIA official, relations have "substantially improved," it added. The new American 'station chief' in The Hague apparently operates more diplomatically.

The CIA carried out operations in the Netherlands that were not made known to the Dutch government. These included an investigation of the dissemination of nuclear technology to Pakistan. The AIVD secret service, the Dutch counterpart of the CIA, in this connection came across CIA activities that were not reported according to the rules applying.

"This according to insiders led to a bizarre situation at a secret visit to the home of a Dutch businessman. Shortly after the AIVD had let itself in and installed microphones and cameras, a CIA team suddenly showed up that had entered the same property. The AIVD were therefore able to film their American colleagues," wrote De Telegraaf. Thus the secret CIA activities emerged.

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