UK Disputes Bush’s Use of Waterboarding to Save Lives

"... Most counter terrorism experts dispute these claims saying there is no evidence to substantiate that waterboarding Al- Qaida leaders helped foil specific attacks on the UK. 'It's unambiguous that waterboarding is torture for the purposes of international law and international law does provide that states should prosecute acts of torture wherever it occurs,' said Tim Cooke-Hurle, a British investigator. ..."

By Swati Maheshwari
NDTV | November 10, 2010

London:  Counter terrorism experts in the UK have disputed claims made by George W Bush in his memoir that acts of torture against terror suspects after 9/11prevented attacks in Britain.

In his book, the former US president says he personally authorised what's called 'waterboarding' as a form of torture- which is a crime under international law.

'Damn Right' that's how George Bush gave the go ahead to CIA to waterboard Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks as described in his recently published memoirs.

'Their interrogations helped break up plots to attack American military and diplomatic facilities abroad, Heathrow airport and Canary Wharf in London, and multiple targets in the United States. Using those techniques saved lives," claimed Bush. (Read:'Waterboarding' saved British lives: George Bush)

The former British Prime Minister Tony Blair sent tanks to Heathrow in February 2003 after intelligence warnings that terrorists were plotting to bring down an aircraft with rocket propelled grenades.

And in 2004 a national daily revealed claims that an air attack on the three towers at Canary Wharf in London was planned. It is these two incidents Mr Bush is thought to be referring to.

While his memoirs are being seen as an attempt to rehabilitate his tarnished reputation but these admissions have generated a controversy in Britain.

Most counter terrorism experts dispute these claims saying there is no evidence to substantiate that waterboarding Al- Qaida leaders helped foil specific attacks on the UK.

"It's unambiguous that waterboarding is torture for the purposes of international law and international law does provide that states should prosecute acts of torture wherever it occurs," said Tim Cooke-Hurle, a British investigator.

While the British government has announced a judicial inquiry on allegations of British involvement in torture, the US has not investigated the circumstances in which it was used by the Bush administration.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/uk-disputes-bush-s-use-of-waterboarding-to-save-lives-65598?cp