White Supremacist’s Conviction Melts Central Alabama Meth Supply

White Supremacist’s Conviction Melts Central Alabama Meth Supply

MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- The conviction of an Autauga County white supremacist has shut down part of a meth pipeline into Autauga, Elmore and Montgomery counties, according to federal authorities.

Mark Edward Elliott, 52, was sentenced to 17 years and five months in federal prison to be followed by five years of supervised release after being convicted of conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance. The sentence was issued Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Montgomery.

Elliott was the leader of a large methamphetamine distribution operation transporting drugs from Atlanta to central Alabama, according to a statement from George L. Beck Jr., U.S. Attorney for the Middle District.

Elliott, a white supremacist, was arrested as part of a major law enforcement drug sweep in March 2013. During the raid, law enforcement found large amounts of "ice" methamphetamine. While executing five search warrants, law enforcement discovered more than 30 firearms, about $1,300 in cash and several vehicles that were being used to transport illegal drugs, according to court records.

The sweep resulted in the arrests of 15 people from four Alabama counties, the culmination of what federal officials said was a yearlong undercover drug operation Five others picked up during the raids were also arrested on charges related to meth smuggling.

Among the five is William "Wild Bill" Elliott, also of Elmore County. William Elliott is Mark Elliott's older brother, who federal authorities have contended was a trusted lieutenant in the operation. Law enforcement has said it was discovered during the investigation that several of the Elliotts' alleged co-conspirators, have also used violence, threats of violence, and intimidation to further their drug dealing efforts and to collect money.

Elliott, who was also known as "Mighty Whitey," has tattoos of Swastikas, the words "White Power" and SS in lightning bolts on his body — all of which indicate membership in the Aryan Brotherhood, according to law enforcement.

Federal records indicate that Elliott was a captain in the Aryan Brotherhood, a powerful prison gang with white supremacy beliefs.

The case was investigated by the Drug Enforcement Agency, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Gulf Coast High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Task Force, the Central Alabama Drug Task Force, the Autauga County Sheriff's Office, the Elmore County Sheriff's Office, the Prattville Police Department and the Wetumpka Police Department.

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