Dr. Charles Crenshaw & the Murder of John Kennedy

" ... [A]s a surgical resident he saw four gunshot wounds in the fallen president. ... Crenshaw's book claimed that Kennedy had four wounds. The fatal shot, he insisted, was fired from the front and could have come from a second gunman. ... "

Published Thursday, November 22, 2001

JFK gunmen theorist, 68
Los Angeles Times Service

Dr. Charles Andrew Crenshaw, who became a favorite of conspiracy buffs when he asserted three decades after the assassination of John F. Kennedy that Lee Harvey Oswald had not acted alone and that as a surgical resident he saw four gunshot wounds in the fallen president, has died. He was 68.

Crenshaw, who disclosed his multiple-gunmen opinions in the 1992 book JFK: Conspiracy of Silence, died Nov. 15 of what his family described as natural causes at his Fort Worth, Texas, home after years of deteriorating health.

On Nov. 22, 1963, Crenshaw was a third-year resident on the trauma team at Dallas' Parkland Memorial Hospital when Kennedy was brought to the emergency room.

Crenshaw disputed the findings of the Warren Commission in his book. The commission, appointed by President Johnson to investigate the Kennedy slaying and the killing of Oswald by Jack Ruby, concluded that Kennedy was killed by two shots through the back of the head and neck that were fired solely by Oswald.

But Crenshaw's book claimed that Kennedy had four wounds. The fatal shot, he insisted, was fired from the front and could have come from a second gunman.

Crenshaw is survived by his wife, Susan; a son, Charles A. Crenshaw II; a daughter, Adelaide Andrews; and two grandchildren.

- MARY ROBERTS WILSON