See: "The SLA is CIA," by Mae Brussell

"1970s radical approved to return to U. of I. to teach in spring," Chicago Tribune, Dec. 5, 2014

Kilgore follows in the footsteps of federal agents provocateur/terrorists Ward Churchill and Bill Ayers, who took teaching positions at ranking universities (with CIA ties), so ...

Bill aimed at Kilgore stalls in Springfield

SPRINGFIELD — A bill that the sponsor said was aimed at preventing former Symbionese Liberation Army member James Kilgore from being employed at the University of Illinois went nowhere in an Illinois House committee Wednesday.

In fact, the sponsor of HB 150, state Rep. Charles Meier, R-Highland, agreed to try amending the bill again after members of the House Higher Education Commitee said his first amendment was too broad.

"We'll go back in and we'll do another rewrite, another amendment," Meier said after the hearing Wednesday. "My main concern is, as we are fighting terrorism around the world; what kind of an example are we giving ISIS and all these other groups around the world when we knowingly go out and hire a convicted terrorist?"

Meier said he wants his amended bill to ban convicted terrorists from teaching at a public university.

"We will go strictly to convicted of terrorism," Meier said.

Meier insisted Wednesday that Kilgore had been convicted of terrorism, but he actually spent five years in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree murder and possession of an explosive device for his role in a 1975 California bank robbery in which a woman was killed.

download"Can you see with what ISIS could do with what happened here today, that we're still saying it's OK that you tried to overthrow the U.S. government and that you killed people while you did that? " Meier said after the hearing. "How do you tell anyone who lost loved ones in 9/11 that's OK for these people to come teach our youth? I don't understand why we want to send that image out in the world."

The bill that Meier brought to the committee Wednesday was more broadly worded and would have banned universities from employing anyone convicted after Sept. 11, 2001 "of attempting to commit, conspiring to commit, soliciting, or committing a Class X felony or any offense committed or attempted in any other state or against the laws of the United States that, if committed or attempted in this State, would have been punishable as a Class X felony."

In introducing the legislation to the committee, Meier said he "had many people in my district come to me after the information came out about Professor Kilgore at the University of Illinois being a convicted terrorist and teaching our youth. People asked why are their tax dollars paying for this?"

But members of the committee said that his legislation might unintentionally cover more university employees than Meier intended.

"We have so many people who are in prison for possession of marijuana and this puts them in the same category," said Rep. Carol Ammons, D-Urbana. "I do know some professors at the university who have not had complaints, who have not committed any crime since the time of their youth, who may be ensnared in this and may lose their teaching positions."

Others asked whether people convicted of crimes are entitled to "a second chance."

"I believe for certain things," Meier said. "But I would not want these people who did these terrible things teaching my children or my grandchildren."

In introducing the legislation to the committee, Meier said he "had many people in my district come to me after the information came out about Professor Kilgore at the University of Illinois being a convicted terrorist and teaching our youth. People asked why are their tax dollars paying for this?"

imagesBut members of the committee said that his legislation might unintentionally cover more university employees than Meier intended.

"We have so many people who are in prison for possession of marijuana and this puts them in the same category," said Rep. Carol Ammons, D-Urbana. "I do know some professors at the university who have not had complaints, who have not committed any crime since the time of their youth, who may be ensnared in this and may lose their teaching positions."

Others asked whether people convicted of crimes are entitled to "a second chance."

"I believe for certain things," Meier said. "But I would not want these people who did these terrible things teaching my children or my grandchildren."

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